Appendix E. Memory Tables Answer Key – CCNP Enterprise Design ENSLD 300-420 Official Cert Guide: Designing Cisco Enterprise Networks

Appendix E. Memory Tables Answer Key

Chapter 1

Table 1-2 IP Protocol Numbers

Protocol Number

IP Protocol

1

Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)

2

Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)

6

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

17

User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

41

IPv6 encapsulation

50

Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)

51

Authentication Header (AH)

58

ICMPv6

88

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)

89

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

103

Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM)

112

Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)

Table 1-3 IPv4 Header Fields

Field

Length

Description

Version

4 bits

Indicates the IP header’s format, based on the version number. Set to 0100 for IPv4.

IHL

4 bits

Length of the header, in 32-bit words.

ToS

8 bits

QoS parameters.

Total Length

16 bits

Length of the packet, in bytes, including header and data.

Identification

16 bits

Identifies a fragment.

Flags

3 bits

Indicates whether a packet is fragmented and whether more fragments follow.

Fragment Offset

13 bits

Location of the fragment in the total packet.

Time to Live

8 bits

Decremented by 1 by each router. When this is 0, the router discards the packet.

Protocol

8 bits

Indicates the upper-layer protocol.

Header Checksum

16 bits

Checksum of the IP header; does not include the data portion.

Source Address

32 bits

IP address of the sending host.

Destination Address

32 bits

IP address of the destination host.

IP Options

Variable

Options for security, loose source routing, record route, and timestamp.

Padding

Variable

Added to ensure that the header ends in a 32-bit boundary.

Table 1-6 DSCP and IP Precedence Values

IP Precedence

Limitation

 

DSCP

 

 

Service Type

Decimal

Binary

Class

Decimal

Codepoint

Routine

0

000

Best effort

0

000000

Priority

1

001

Assured Forwarding (AF) Class 1

8 to 14

001xxx

Immediate

2

010

AF Class 2

16 to 22

010xxx

Flash

3

011

AF Class 3

24 to 30

011xxx

Flash override

4

100

AF Class 4

32 to 38

100xxx

Critical

5

101

Expedited Forwarding (EF)

40 to 46

101xxx

Internetwork control

6

110

Control

48

110xxx

Network control

7

111

Control

56

111xxx

Table 1-8 IP DSCP Values

DSCP Class

DSCP Codepoint Value

DSCP Decimal

Default

000000

0

CS1

001000

8

AF11

001010

10

AF12

001100

12

AF13

001110

14

CS2

010000

16

AF21

010010

18

AF22

010100

20

AF23

010110

22

CS3

011000

24

AF31

011010

26

AF32

011100

28

AF33

011110

30

CS4

100000

32

AF41

100010

34

AF42

100100

36

AF43

100110

38

CS5

101000

40

EF

101110

46

CS6

110000

48

CS7

111000

56

Table 1-13 NAT Concepts

NAT Address Type

Description

Static NAT

Commonly used to assign a network device with an internal private IP address a unique public address so that it can be accessed from the Internet.

Dynamic NAT

Dynamically maps an unregistered or private IP address to a registered IP address from a pool (group) of registered addresses.

PAT

Maps multiple unregistered or private IP addresses to a single registered IP address by using different ports.

Inside local address

The real IP address of a device that resides in the internal network. This address is used in the stub domain.

Inside global address

The translated IP address of the device that resides in the internal network. This address is used in the public network.

Outside global address

The real IP address of a device that resides on the Internet, outside the stub domain.

Outside local address

The translated IP address of a device that resides on the Internet. This address is used inside the stub domain.

Chapter 2

Table 2-6 IPv6 Address Types

IPv6 Address Type

Description

Unicast

The IP address of an interface on a single host. It can be a source or destination address.

Anycast

An IP address that identifies a set of devices within an area. It can be only a destination address.

Multicast

An IP address that reaches a group of hosts identified by the address. It can be only a destination address.

Table 2-7 IPv6 Address Prefixes

IPv6 Address Type

Prefix

Loopback address

0000::0001

Unspecified address

0000::0000

Global unicast address

2000::/3

Unique local unicast

FC00::/7

Link-local unicast address

FE80:/10

Multicast address

FF00::/8

OSPFv3

FF02::5

EIGRP routers

FF02::A

DHCP

FF02::C

Table 2-8 IPv6 Address Autoconfiguration Scheme

IPv6 Address Configuration Scheme

Description

Manual configuration

Used for routers, switches, servers, and firewalls.

SLAAC link-local

Host sends a Neighbor Solicitation message that includes the target IPv6 address that begins with FE80::.

SLAAC global unique

Combines the router prefix with the local MAC address.

DHCPv6

Provides stateful address allocation.

Table 2-9 IPv6 Mechanisms

IPv6 Mechanism

Description

ICMPv6

Performs diagnostics and reachability information. Has a Next Header number of 58.

IPv6 Neighbor Discovery

Discovers all nodes in the same link and checks for duplicate addresses.

AAAA

DNS resource record for IPv6.

SLAAC

Performs stateless IPv6 address assignment.

DHCPv6

Provides stateful IPv6 address assignment.

RIPng

Routing protocol that uses UDP port 521.

EIGRP for IPv6

Cisco routing protocol for IPv6.

OSPFv3

Link-state routing protocol for IPv6.

Table 2-12 NAT64 Stateless and Stateful NAT64 Comparison

Factor

Stateless

Stateful

Translation

1:1 translation, which is limited in the number of endpoints

1:many translation

Address conservation

No conservation of IPv4 addresses

Conserves IPv4 addresses

Address transparency

Helps ensure end-to-end transparency

Uses address overloading; lacks end-to-end address transparency

IPv6 address type

Requires IPv4-translatable IPv6 addresses

No requirement for the characteristics of IPv6 addresses

Address assignment

Requires manual or DHCPv6 address assignment

Can use manual address assignment, DHCPv6, or SLAAC

Table 2-15 IPv6 and IPv4 Characteristics

Characteristic

IPv6

IPv4

Address length

128 bits

32 bits

Address representation

Hexadecimal

Dotted decimal

Header length

Fixed (40 bytes)

Variable

Upper-layer protocols

Next Header field

Protocol Type field

Link address resolution

ND

ARP

Address configuration

SLAAC or stateful DHCP

Stateful DHCP

DNS (name-to-address resolution)

AAAA records

A records

Interior routing protocols

EIGRPv6, OSPFv3, RIPng, IS-IS for IPv6

EIGRP, OSPFv2, RIPv2, IS-IS

Classification and marking

Traffic Class and Flow Label fields, Differentiated Services Codepoint (DSCP)

IP Precedence bits, Type of Service field, DSCP

Private addresses

Unique local addresses

RFC 1918 private address space

Fragmentation

Sending host only

Sending host and intermediate routers

Loopback address

0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1

127.0.0.1

Address scope types

Unicast, anycast, multicast

Unicast, multicast, broadcast

Chapter 3

Table 3-7 Default EIGRP Values for Bandwidth and Delay

EIGRP Term

Definition

Successor route

The route with the lowest metric to reach a destination.

Successor

The first next-hop router for the successor route.

Feasible distance (FD)

The best metric along a path to a destination network, including the metric to the neighbor advertising that path.

Reported distance (RD)

The total metric along a path to a destination network, as advertised by an upstream neighbor.

Feasibility condition

A condition in which the reported distance received for a route is less than the feasible distance calculated locally, thus making it a backup route.

Feasible successor

A route that satisfies the feasibility condition and is maintained as a backup route.

Table 3-8 EIGRP Route States

EIGRP Route State

Definition

Active

The current successor no longer satisfies the feasibility condition, and there are no feasible successors identified for that destination. The router is in the query process to find a loop-free alternative route.

Passive

The router has identified successors to a destination. The router is not performing a recomputation.

Stuck-in-active

The router that issued the query gives up and clears its connection to the router that is not answering, effectively restarting the neighbor session.

Chapter 4

Table 4-3 OSPF Router Types

Type

Description

Internal router

Any router whose interfaces all belong to the same OSPF area. Such a router keeps only one link-state database.

Area border router (ABR)

A router that is connected to more than one area. Such a router maintains a link-state database for each area it belongs to. These routers generate summary LSAs.

Autonomous system boundary router (ASBR)

A router that injects external LSAs into the OSPF database (redistribution). These external routes are learned via either other routing protocols or static routes.

Backbone router

A router with at least one interface attached to Area 0.

Table 4-4 Major LSA Types

Type Code

Type

Description

1

Router LSA

Produced by every router. Includes all the router’s links, interfaces, link states, and costs. This LSA type is flooded within a single area and does not travel into other areas.

2

Network LSA

Produced by every DR on every broadcast or NBMA network. It lists all the routers in the multiaccess network. This LSA type is contained within an area.

3

Summary LSA for ABRs

Produced by ABRs. It is sent into an area to advertise destinations outside the area.

4

Summary LSA for ASBRs

Originated by ABRs. Sent into an area by the ABR to advertise the IP addresses of the ASBRs. It does not advertise networks outside the OSPF network; only the ASBR does that.

5

Autonomous system external LSA

Originated by ASBRs. Advertises destinations external to the OSPF autonomous system, flooded throughout the whole OSPF autonomous system.

7

Not-so-stubby area (NSSA) external LSA

Originated by ASBRs in an NSSA. It is not flooded throughout the OSPF autonomous system but only to the NSSA. Similar to the Type 5 LSA.

Table 4-6 OSPFv3 LSA Types

LSA Name

LS Type

Description

Router LSA

0x2001

Specifies the state of a router interface

Network LSA

0x2002

Generated by DR routers in broadcast or NBMA networks

Interarea-prefix LSA

0x2003

Routes to prefixes in other areas

Interarea-router LSA

0x2004

Routes to routers in other areas

Autonomous system external LSA

0x4005

Routes to networks external to the autonomous system

Group-membership LSA

0x2006

Routes to networks that contain multicast groups

NSSA Type 7 LSA

0x2007

Routes to networks external to the autonomous system, injected into the NSSA

Link LSA

0x0008

Tells neighbors about link-local addresses and list IPv6 prefixes associated with the link

Intra-area-prefix LSA

0x2009

Specifies IPv6 prefixes connected to a router, a stub network, or an associated transit network segment

Table 4-7 BGP Attributes

BGP Attribute

Description

Category

Origin

Indicates the source of the path information: IGP, EGP, or incomplete.

Well-known mandatory

AS_Path

Lists the ASNs in the path to the destination.

Well-known mandatory

Next hop

Specifies the IP address of the router as the next hop to the destination.

Well-known mandatory

Local preference

Specifies the path to use to exit the AS.

Well-known discretionary

MED

Tells an external BGP peer the preferred path into the AS.

Optional non-transitive

Community

Groups routes and applies policies or decisions (accept, prefer) to those routes. (Not an attribute used in the routing-decision process.)

Optional transitive

Atomic aggregate

Informs BGP peers that the local router used a less specific (aggregated) route to a destination instead of using a more specific route.

Well-known discretionary

Weight

Specifies a preferred path if multiple paths exist out of a router for a destination. Assigned locally on a router.

Optional (Cisco specific)

Table 4-8 BGP Best Path Order

BGP Best Path Order

Highest weight

Highest local preference

Prefer local originated route

Shortest AS_Path

Lowest origin type

Lowest MED

Prefer eBGP over iBGP

Lowest IGP metric to the BGP next hop

Oldest path

Lowest BGP router ID source

Minimum cluster list length

Lowest neighbor address

Chapter 5

Table 5-3 IP Multicast Protocols

IP Multicast Protocol

Description

IGMP

A host sends an IGMP query message to the router, and the switch adds the host to the multicast group and permits that port to receive multicast traffic.

PIM-SM

This protocol assumes that no hosts want to receive multicast traffic unless specifically requested.

BIDIR-PIM

This protocol never builds a shortest path tree.

SSM

This protocol eliminates the RPs and shared trees and only builds an SPT.

MSDP

This protocol is used to interconnect multiple PIM-SM domains.

Table 5-4 Well-Known Multicast Addresses

Multicast Address

Multicast Group

FF01::1

All nodes (node-local)

FF02::1

All nodes (link-local)

FF01::2

All routers (node-local)

FF02::2

All routers (link-local)

FF02::5

OSPFv3 routers

FF02::6

OSPFv3 DRs

FF02::9

Routing Information Protocol (RIPng)

FF02::A

EIGRP routers

FF02::B

Mobile agents

FF02::C

DHCP servers/relay agents

FF02::D

All PIM routers

Table 5-6 SNMP Message Types

SNMP Message

Description

Get Request

Retrieves the value of a specific MIB variable.

GetNext Request

Retrieves the next issuance of the MIB variable.

Get Response

Contains the values of the requested variable.

Set Request

Modifies the value of a MIB variable.

Trap

Transmits an unsolicited alarm condition.

GetBulk

Reduces repetitive requests for MIB variables.

Inform Request

Alerts an SNMP manager about specific conditions with a confirmation.

Table 5-11 NetFlow, CDP, Syslog, and RMON

Technology

Description

NetFlow

Collects network flow data for network planning, performance, accounting, and billing applications.

CDP

Proprietary protocol for network discovery that provides information on neighboring devices.

Syslog

Reports state information based on facility and severity levels.

RMON

Provides aggregate information of network statistics and LAN traffic.

Chapter 6

Table 6-2 Cisco Hierarchical Layer Functions

Hierarchical Layer

Layer Functions

Core

Fast transport

 

High reliability

 

Redundancy

 

Fault tolerance

 

Low latency and good manageability

 

Avoidance of slow packet manipulation caused by filters or other processes

 

Limited and consistent diameter

 

QoS

Distribution

Policy-based connectivity

 

Redundancy and load balancing

 

Aggregation of LAN wiring closets

 

Aggregation of WAN connections

 

QoS

 

Security filtering

 

Address or area aggregation or summarization

 

Departmental or workgroup access

 

Broadcast or multicast domain definition

 

Routing between VLANs

 

Media translations (for example, between Ethernet and Token Ring)

 

Redistribution between routing domains (for example, between two different routing protocols)

 

Demarcation between static and dynamic routing protocols

Access

Layer 2 switching

 

High availability

 

Port security

 

Broadcast suppression

 

QoS

 

Rate limiting

 

ARP inspection

 

VACLs

 

Spanning tree

 

Trust classification

 

Network access control (NAC)

 

PoE and auxiliary VLANs for VoIP

Table 6-7 Campus Transmission Media Comparison

Factor

Copper/UTP

Multimode Fiber

Single-Mode Fiber

Bandwidth

Up to 10 Gbps

Up to 10 Gbps

Up to 10 Gbps

Distance

Up to 100 m

Up to 2 km (Fast Ethernet)

Up to 100 km (Fast Ethernet)

 

 

Up to 550 m (Gigabit Ethernet)

Up to 5 km (Gigabit Ethernet)

 

 

Up to 300 m (10 Gigabit Ethernet)

Up to 40 km (10 Gigabit Ethernet)

Price

Inexpensive

Moderate

Moderate to expensive

Recommended use

End stations

Building access to distribution switch uplinks; peer-to-peer switch links

Long-distance links

Table 6-8 Cisco PoE and UPOE Comparison

Category

PoE

PoE+

Cisco UPOE

Cisco UPOE+

Minimum cable type

CAT 5e

CAT 5e

CAT 5e

CAT 6a

IEEE standard

802.3af

802.3at

Cisco proprietary

Cisco proprietary

Maximum power to the PSE port

15.4W

30W

60W

90W

Maximum power to the PD

12.95W

25.5.W

51W

71.3W

UTP pairs

2

2

4

4

Distance

100 m

100 m

100 m

100 m

Table 6-10 Mechanisms in Cisco STP Toolkit

Mechanism

Improves Spanning Tree Protocol Performance or Stability?

Description

PortFast

Performance

Bypasses the listening and learning phases to transition directly to the forwarding state. Apply to all end-user ports.

UplinkFast

Performance

Enables fast uplink failover on an access switch.

BackboneFast

Performance

Enables fast convergence in distribution and core layers when Spanning Tree Protocol changes occur.

Loop Guard

Stability

Prevents an alternate or root port from being the designated port in the absence of bridge protocol data units (BPDUs).

Root Guard

Stability

Prevents external switches from becoming the root of the Spanning Tree Protocol tree. Apply to all ports where it is not expected.

BPDU Guard

Stability

Disables a PortFast-enabled port if a BPDU is received.

BPDU Filter

Stability

Suppresses BPDUs on ports.

Table 6-11 Loop Guard and UDLD Comparison

Functionality

Loop Guard

UDLD

Configuration

Per port

Per port

Action granularity

Per VLAN

Per port

Protection against Spanning Tree Protocol failures caused by unidirectional links

Yes, when enabled on all root and alternate ports in a redundant topology

Yes, when enabled on all links in a redundant topology

Protection against Spanning Tree Protocol failures caused by problems in the software (designated switch does not send BPDUs)

Yes

No

Protection against miswiring

No

Yes

Chapter 7

Table 7-4 Access Layer Designs

Access Layer Design Model

Description

Traditional Layer 2 access layer

Layer 2 switch forwards traffic via trunk ports to distribution switches. Spanning Tree Protocol blocks one of the uplink trunks.

Updated Layer 2 access layer

Uses VSS and MEC to provide additional uplink bandwidth.

Layer 3 access layer

Layer 3 SVIs are defined in the access layer, and there is no need for an FHRP.

Hybrid access layer

Layer 3 routing in the access layer and in the distribution layer.

Table 7-5 Campus Layer Design Best Practices

Layer

Best Practices

Access layer

Limit VLANs to a single closet, when possible, to provide the most deterministic and highly available topology.

Use RPVST+ if Spanning Tree Protocol is required. It provides the best convergence.

Set trunks to ON and ON with no-negotiate.

Manually prune unused VLANs to avoid broadcast propagation.

Use VTP Transparent mode because there is little need for a common VLAN database in hierarchical networks.

Disable trunking on host ports because it is not necessary. Doing so provides more security and speeds up PortFast.

Consider implementing routing in the access layer to provide fast convergence and Layer 3 load balancing. Or use the Updated Layer 2 access layer design with VSS.

Use Cisco STP Toolkit, which provides PortFast, Loop Guard, Root Guard, and BPDU Guard.

Distribution layer

Use first-hop redundancy protocols. HSRP, VRRP, or GLBP should be used if you implement Layer 2 links between the access and distribution.

Use Layer 3 links between the distribution and core switches to allow for fast convergence and load balancing.

Build Layer 3 triangles, not squares.

Use the distribution switches to connect Layer 2 VLANs that span multiple access layer switches.

Summarize routes from the distribution layer to the core layer of the network to reduce routing overhead.

Use VSS as an option to eliminate the use of Spanning Tree Protocol.

Core layer

Reduce switch peering by using redundant triangle connections between switches.

Use routing that provides a topology with no spanning-tree loops.

Use Layer 3 switches that provide intelligent services that Layer 2 switches do not support.

Use two equal-cost paths to every destination network.

Chapter 8

Table 8-2 WAN Comparison

WAN Technology

Bandwidth

Reliability

Latency

Cost

Layer 2 VPN

High

High

Low

High

4G/5G

Low/medium

Low

Medium

Medium

Metro Ethernet

Medium/high

High

Low

Medium

MPLS Layer 3 VPN

High

High

Low

High

SD-WAN with two transports (Internet/MPLS)

Medium/high

Medium

Medium

Medium/high

DWDM

High

High

Low

High

Table 8-3 Benefits of Ethernet Handoffs at the Customer Edge

Benefit

Description

Service-enabling solution

Layering value-added services in addition to the network

Flexible architecture

No need for a truck roll for increasing port speeds

 

No need for new customer premises equipment (CPE)

 

Evolving existing WAN services to an IP-based solution

Seamless enterprise integration

Ease of integration with existing LAN network equipment

Table 8-4 SD-WAN Platform Options

Physical Devices

Software Devices

Branch Services/Data Center

vEdge Appliances for Branch/Data Center

Universal CPE

Private Cloud

Public Cloud

ISR 1000

200 Mbps

vEdge 100

100 Mbps

ENCS 5100

vEdgeCloud: ISRv

Up to 250 Mbps

OpenStack

vEdgeCloud: CSR1000v

Microsoft Azure

vEdgeCloud: CSR1000v

ISR 4000

Up to 2 Gbps

vEdge 1000

Up to 1Gbps

ENCS 5400

vEdgeCloud: ISRv

250 Mbps–2 Gbps

ESXi

CSR1000v

Amazon Web Services

vEdgeCloud: CSR1000v

ASR 1000 Fixed

2.5 Gbps and up

vEdge 2000

10 Gbps

 

KVM

CSR1000v

 

Table 8-5 WAN Link Characteristics

 

Use

Cost

Advantages

Examples

Private

WAN to connect distant LANs

Private equipment

Private configuration

Expensive to maintain

High security

Transmission quality

Metro Ethernet using dark fiber

Shared

Shared-circuit or label-switched WAN

Relatively low cost

Leased bandwidth

Leased or private equipment

Provider maintenance

Shared network for multiple sites

MPLS

Chapter 9

Table 9-2 Key Design Principles

Design Principle

Description

High availability

Redundancy through hardware, software, and connectivity

Scalability

Modularity with additional devices, services, and technologies

Security

Measures to protect business data

Performance

Enough capacity and bandwidth for applications

Manageability

Ease of managing and maintaining the infrastructure

Standards and regulations

Compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and standards

Cost

Appropriate security and technologies given the budget

Table 9-3 Application Requirements for Data, Voice, and Video Traffic

Characteristic

Data File Transfer

Interactive Data Application

Real-Time Voice

Real-Time Video

Response time

Reasonable

Within a second

One-way delay less than 150 ms with low delay and jitter

Minimum delay and jitter

Throughput and packet loss tolerance

High/medium

Low/low

Low/low

High/medium

Downtime (high reliability = low downtime)

Reasonable

Low

Low

Minimum

Table 9-4 Physical Bandwidth Comparison

WAN Connectivity

Bandwidth: Up to 100 Mbps

Bandwidth: 1 Gbps to 10 Gbps

Copper

Fast Ethernet

Gigabit Ethernet, 10 Gigabit Ethernet

Fiber

Fast Ethernet

Gigabit Ethernet, 10 Gigabit Ethernet, SONET/SDH, dark fiber

Wireless

LTE/5G

802.11a/g

LTE/LTE Advanced

802.11n/ac Wave1/Wave2

LTE Advance Pro/5G

Table 9-5 Availability Percentages

Availability

Downtime per Year

The Nines of Availability

Targets

99.000000%

3.65 days

Two nines

 

99.900000%

8.76 hours

Three nines

 

99.990000%

52.56 minutes

Four nines

Branch WAN high availability

99.999000%

5.256 minutes

Five nines

Branch WAN high availability

99.999900%

31.536 seconds

Six nines

Ultra high availability

99.999990%

3.1536 seconds

Seven nines

Ultra high availability

99.999999%

.31536 seconds

Eight nines

Ultra high availability

Table 9-7 QoS Options

QoS Category

Description

Classification

Identifies and marks flows

Congestion management

Handles traffic overflow using a queuing algorithm

Link-efficiency mechanisms

Reduce latency and jitter for network traffic on low-speed links

Traffic shaping and policing

Prevent congestion by policing ingress and egress flows

Table 9-8 Link-Efficiency Mechanisms

Mechanisms

Description

Link fragmentation and interleaving (LFI)

Reduces delay and jitter on slower-speed links by breaking up large packet flows and inserting smaller data packets (Telnet, VoIP) in between them.

Multilink PPP (MLP)

Bonds multiple links together between two nodes, which increases the available bandwidth. MLP can be used on analog or digital links and is based on RFC 1990.

Real-Time Transport (RTP) header compression

Provides increased efficiency for applications that take advantage of RTP on slow links. Compresses RTP/UDP/IP headers from 40 bytes down to 2 bytes to 5 bytes.

Chapter 10

Table 10-2 SD-Access Very Small Site Guidelines

SD-Access Component Description

Size

Endpoints

Up to 2000

IP pools

Up to 8

Virtual networks

Up to 8

Border nodes

Up to 1

Control plane nodes

Up to 1

Edge nodes

Up to 1

Wireless LAN controllers

Up to 1

Access points

Up to 100

Table 10-3 SD-Access Small Site Guidelines

SD-Access Component Description

Size

Endpoints

Up to 10,000

IP pools

Up to 100

Virtual networks

Up to 32

Border nodes

Up to 2

Control plane nodes

Up to 2

Edge nodes

Up to 25

Wireless LAN controllers

Up to 2

Access points

Up to 200

Table 10-4 SD-Access Medium Site Guidelines

SD-Access Component Description

Size

Endpoints

Up to 25,000

IP pools

Up to 300

Virtual networks

Up to 64

Border nodes

Up to 2

Control plane nodes

Up to 4

Edge nodes

Up to 250

Wireless LAN controllers

Up to 2

Access points

Up to 1000

Table 10-5 SD-Access Large Site Guidelines

SD-Access Component Description

Size

Endpoints

Up to 50,000

IP pools

Up to 500

Virtual networks

Up to 64

Border nodes

Up to 4

Control plane nodes

Up to 6

Edge nodes

Up to 1000

Wireless LAN controllers

Up to 2

Access points

Up to 2000

Chapter 12

Table 12-2 Common HTTP Response Codes

Response Code

Description

 

 

Success Messages (2xxx)

200

Request succeeded

 

 

201

The request has been fulfilled; new resource created

 

 

204

The server fulfilled the request but does not return a body

 

 

Client Errors (4xx)

400

Bad request; malformed syntax

 

 

401

Unauthorized

 

 

403

Server understood request but refuses to fulfill it

 

 

Server Errors (5xx)

500

Internal server error

 

 

501

Not implemented

 

 

Table 12-3 Cisco-Supported Products for YANG, NETCONF, and RESTCONF

Cisco-Supported Products

YANG, NETCONF, and/or RESTCONF

Tail-f Network Control System

NETCONF/YANG

Tail-f Confd Agent

NETCONF/YANG

Open SDN Controller/OpenDaylight

NETCONF/YANG/RESTCONF

IOS XR

NETCONF/YANG

NX-OS

NETCONF

IOS XE

NETCONF

Table 12-4 Leaf Attributes

Attribute

Description

config

Specifies whether this leaf is a configurable value (“true”) or an operational value (“false”) and is inherited from the parent container if not specified.

default

Specifies the default value for this leaf and implies that the leaf is optional.

mandatory

Specifies whether the leaf is mandatory (“true”) or optional (“false”).

must

Specifies the XPath constraint that will be enforced for this leaf.

type

Specifies the data type (and range) of this leaf.

when

Indicates a conditional leaf, which is present only if the XPath expression is true.

description

Provides a human-readable definition and help text for the leaf.

reference

Provides a human-readable reference to some other element or spec.

units

Provides a human-readable unit specification (for example, Hz, Mbps, °F).

status

Indicates whether this leaf is current, deprecated, or obsolete.

Table 12-5 NETCONF Protocol Operations

Operation

Description

<get-config>

Retrieves all or part of a specified configuration

<edit-config>

Loads all or part of a specified configuration (for example, create, merge, replace, delete)

<get>

Retrieves all or part of a running configuration and device operational data

<get-schema>

Retrieves the device schema

<lock>

Locks the entire configuration data store (that is, candidate)

<unlock>

Removes the lock on the entire configuration data store (that is, candidate)

<close-session>

Requests graceful session termination

Table 12-6 RESTCONF CRUD Operations

Operation

Description

URI

GET

Gets a resource

GET /restconf/data/my-interfaces:interfaces/interface/<some name>

POST

Creates a resource or invokes an operation

POST /restconf/data/my-interfaces:flap-interface + JSON/XML Form Data

PUT

Replaces a resource

PUT /restconf/data/my-interfaces:interfaces/interface/<some name>

+ JSON/XML Form Data

DELETE

Removes a resource

DELETE /restconf/data/my-interfaces:interface/<some name>

Table 12-7 Telemetry Methods

Method

Description

Model-driven telemetry

Provides a mechanism to stream data from a model-driven telemetry–capable device to a receiver

Cadence-based telemetry

Continuously streams operational statistics and state transitions at a configured cadence or time frame

Policy-based telemetry

Streams data to a receiver using a policy file that defines the data to stream and the frequency for getting the data